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Science-Backed Benefits of Keratin

Science-Backed Benefits of Keratin

The secret behind silky, glossy hair after the famous Brazilian Blowout is keratin.

Keratin is one of the protein building blocks that makes up your hair, skin, and nails. Keratin is a protective protein, meaning it’s less likely to tear than other types of proteins.

While keratin can be used as a topical application (like in Brazilian Blowout or keratin hair extensions), its most effective action comes from taking it as a supplement.

BeautyFul uses the most premium, bioavailable natural keratin available on the market, Cynatine® HNS. Cynatine® HNS is curated through a patented process that enables the intact keratin molecule to be solubilized, making it both bioactive and bio‐available to the body.

Additional benefits observed in clinical research include reversing the effect of aging skin, protecting the skin against damage and improving the strength and luster of nails.

In one study of Cynatine® HNS, subjects with damaged, fragile or stressed hair took keratin. Evaluations were performed after 30, 60 and 90 days by a dermatologist and self-assessment. Results demonstrated that at both 60 and 90 day measurements, subjects lost less hair. At 90 days, the density of the subjects’ hair had significantly increased.  And finally, self‐reported data also indicated subjects perceived their hair to have more brightness.1

Cynatine® HNS has also been shown to improve brightness and radiance of skin by protecting it from oxidative stress. Experimental data reveals that ingested Cynatine® HNS helps to build the cells’ glutathione supply, resulting in an increase in serum levels of glutathione‐dependent peroxidase, a primary antioxidant that protects the skin from photo-aging damage, suggesting that Cynatine® HNS promotes healthy skin.2

Keep your hair, skin, and nails strong & supple with keratin.


  1. Beer et al. A Clinical Trial to Investigate the Effect of Cynatine HNS on Hair and Nail Parameters. Hindawi Publishing Corporation. The Scientific World Journal Volume 2014, Article ID 641723, 6 pages
  2. Matsuo M, Ikeda H, Sugihara T, Horiike S, Okano Y and Masaki H: Resistance of cultured human skin fibroblasts from old and young donors to oxidative stress and their glutathione peroxidase activity. Gerontology. 50:193–199. 2004.
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